Notification: NRS GD55/198

Description (from People of Medieval Scotland)

King Alexander II announces that in presence of king and his barons at colloquium at Liston (Kirkliston) in 1235 a friendly composition was made between Melrose Abbey and Roger Avenel, consequent on monks' allegations that Roger introduced a horse-stud and cattle into their land in Eskdale, destroyed their houses, and levelled their dikes and enclosures. Roger has granted that neither he nor his heirs nor their men shall have a horse-stud, or cattle, pigs, sheep or any other beasts, within marches specified in his charter, unless by monks' permission, which king and his barons have elucidated as follows. That is, Roger and his heirs shall have stag and hind, boar and sow, buck and doe; also eyries of hawks and sparrow-hawks, so that monks must not maliciously prevent them from nesting where they normally nest, especially by felling trees where they continue to build their eyries. Otherwise monks may erect huts and buildings wherever they wish. The king and his barons have also determined concerning thieves and trespassers that monks or their men shall not be deemed trespassers when they graze their cattle or go about their other business. The monks are not to hunt in these lands with packs of hounds or nets, or to bring others to hunt there, or to set traps, except for wolves. Roger and his heirs are to hunt without damage to crops, fences, meadows, flocks, beasts and all other possessions of monks.

Current location

Repository
National Records of Scotland
Town or City
Edinburgh
Shelfmark
GD55/198

Other information

Catalogue Numbers
PoMS Document 1/7/246
RRS, iii no. 239
Format
Unspecified
Date
8 April 1236

People of Medieval Scotland (PoMS Document 1/7/246)

King Alexander II announces that in presence of king and his barons at colloquium at Liston (Kirkliston) in 1235 a friendly composition was made between Melrose Abbey and Roger Avenel, consequent on monks' allegations that Roger introduced a horse-stud and cattle into their land in Eskdale, destroyed their houses, and levelled their dikes and enclosures. Roger has granted that neither he nor his heirs nor their men shall have a horse-stud, or cattle, pigs, sheep or any other beasts, within marches specified in his charter, unless by monks' permission, which king and his barons have elucidated as follows. That is, Roger and his heirs shall have stag and hind, boar and sow, buck and doe; also eyries of hawks and sparrow-hawks, so that monks must not maliciously prevent them from nesting where they normally nest, especially by felling trees where they continue to build their eyries. Otherwise monks may erect huts and buildings wherever they wish. The king and his barons have also determined concerning thieves and trespassers that monks or their men shall not be deemed trespassers when they graze their cattle or go about their other business. The monks are not to hunt in these lands with packs of hounds or nets, or to bring others to hunt there, or to set traps, except for wolves. Roger and his heirs are to hunt without damage to crops, fences, meadows, flocks, beasts and all other possessions of monks.

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